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We are pleased to announce the merger of Rothschild House Surgery and Markyate Surgery effective from 31st May 2017.


We believe this merger offers important patient benefits combining our strengths, enhancing our team and enabling us to further enhance patient experience. Whilst this merger obviously signifies change, we are committed to making the process of integrating the two practices seamless to you.



What does this mean for patients of Markyate Surgery?


Between now and the 31st of May the service provided to patients at Markyate Surgery will not change. After the 31st of May the Doctors providing surgeries will change. It is the intention for a regular Doctor from Rothschild House Surgery to provide surgeries at Markyate to replace those provided by Dr Sepai. Dr Walter’s surgeries at Markyate will not change. The existing services and staff at Markyate will continue as before. Dr Sepai will leave after 21 years, to pursue new ventures from June 2017. Rothschild House Surgery intends to extend additional services currently provided at Tring to Markyate patients in due course. The philosophy of Rothschild House Surgery is to provide personal care close to home from a consistent clinical team focused on continuity of care and this philosophy will be extended to Markyate. There are no current plans to change the catchment area for Markyate Surgery.


What about the surgery premises?


Rothschild House Surgery is aware of the history and current situation with regard to the Markyate Surgery premises and the need to improve these in the future. There are on-going negotiations with NHS England, Herts Valleys CCG and Dacorum Borough Council to develop new premises that Rothschild House Surgery has been involved in and is committed and determined to see this development happen for the benefit of patients.


What will happen next?


As any developments are made over the next few months Rothschild House Surgery and Markyate Surgery will keep patients informed of these.


Children's Immunisation Schedule

Here's a checklist of the vaccines that are routinely offered to everyone in the UK for free on the NHS, and the age at which you should ideally have them.

2 months:

  • Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib, a bacterial infection that can cause severe pneumonia or meningitis in young children) given as a 5-in-1 single jab known as DTaP/IPV/Hib
  • Pneumococcal infection
  • Rotavirus (oral)
  • Meningitis B

immunisation3 months:

  • 5-in-1, second dose (DTaP/IPV/Hib)
  • Rotavirus (oral)

4 months:

  • 5-in-1, third dose (DTaP/IPV/Hib)
  • Pneumococcal infection, second dose
  • Meningitis B

Between 12 and 13 months:

  • Hib/Meningitis C
  • MMR (measles, mumps and rubella)
  • Pneumococcal infection
  • Meningitis B

3 years and 4 months, or soon after:

  • MMR second jab
  • Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and polio (DtaP/IPV), given as a 4-in-1 pre-school booster

Around 12-13 years:

  • Cervical cancer (HPV) vaccine, which protects against cervical cancer (girls only): three jabs given within six months

Around 13-18 years:

  • Diphtheria, tetanus and polio booster (Td/IPV), given as a single jab in school
  • Meningitis ACW & Y

65 and over:

  • Flu (every year)
  • Pneumococcal

HPA Childrens Vaccination Schedule

Click here for the recommended HPA vaccination schedule


Seasonal Flu Vaccination

Influenza – flu – is a highly infectious and potentially serious illness caused by influenza viruses. Each year the make-up of the seasonal flu vaccine is designed to protect against the influenza viruses that the World Healflujabsth Organization decide are most likely to be circulating in the coming winter.

Regular immunisation (vaccination) is given free of charge to the following at-risk people, to protect them from seasonal flu:

  • people aged 65 or over,
  • people with a serious medical condition
  • people living in a residential or nursing home
  • the main carers for an elderly or disabled person whose welfare may be at risk if the carer becomes ill
  • healthcare or social care professionals directly involved in patient care 

Pregnant women & the Flu Vaccination

It is recommended that all pregnant women should have the flu vaccine, whatever stage of pregnancy they're in. This is because there is good evidence that pregnant women have an increased risk of developing complications if they get flu, particularly from the H1N1 strain.

Studies have shown that the flu vaccine can be safely and effectively given during any trimester of pregnancy. The vaccine does not carry risks for either the mother or baby. In fact, studies have shown that mothers who have had the vaccine while pregnant pass some protection to their babies, which lasts for the first few months of their lives.  


These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice

 
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